About Our Editors

Holly Brewer cropped version copyHolly Brewer, Burke Professor of American History at the University of Maryland,  specializes in Early American history, cultural and intellectual history, legal history, and comparative history, primarily with Britain. She is the author of By Birth or Consent: Children, Law, and the Anglo-American Revolution in Authority, which was published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and UNC Press (2005). It won the 2006 J. Willard Hurst Prize from the Law and Society Association as well as the 2006 Cromwell Prize from the American Society for Legal History, and the 2008 Biennial Book Prize of the Order of the Coif from the American Association of Law Schools. She also won three prizes for her article “Entailing Aristocracy in Colonial Virginia” (1997).

She is interested in debates about justice in the early modern world.  She would like to hear from scholars interested in any aspect of land and contract law, in the comparative law of slavery, and in domestic law, as well as other topics related to law and society in the early Modern Atlantic world. She is fascinated by questions surrounding the role of the law in shaping society and vice versa, and in complicating how we think about economic and social history by putting power and the law back into our narrative and analytic frameworks.

Contact Information:
hbrewer@umd.edu

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Michael Lobban Picture LSEMichael Lobban, Professor of Legal History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, specializes in Contract Law, Legal  History and Legal Theory. His research interests lie in the field of English legal history and the history of jurisprudence. He is one of the authors of The Oxford History of the Laws of England, vols XI-XIII  (Oxford 2010), in which he covered the history of contract law, tort  and commercial law for the period 1820-1914. He is also the author of A  History of the Philosophy of Law in the Common Law World, 1600-1900  (Springer 2007). His earlier  books include White Man’s Justice: South African Political Trials in  the Black Consciousness Era (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996) and The  Common Law and English Jurisprudence, 1760-1850 (Oxford: Clarendon  Press, 1991), which was the joint winner of the Society of Public Teachers of Law’s prize for outstanding legal scholarship in 1992. He has written widely on aspects of private law and on law reform in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as well as co-editing a number books, including, Legitimacy and Illegitimacy in Nineteenth Century Law Literature and History (Palgrave MacMillan 2010, with Margot Finn and Jenny Bourne Taylor), Law and History (Oxford 2003, with Andrew Lewis) and Communities and courts in Britain, 1150-1900 (Hambledon Press, 1997, with Christopher W. Brooks.

Michael is particularly interested in working with scholars in British history, legal philosophy, as well as imperial and transnational legal history.

Contact Information:
m.j.lobban@lse.ac.uk

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Sally Gordon for ASLH siteSarah Barringer (Sally) Gordon, Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, teaches in the areas of church and state, property, and legal history in the law school, and American religious and constitutional history in the history department.  Sally is the author of a book in Studied in Legal History, The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (University of North Carolina Press, 2002), and The Spirit of the Law Religious Voices and the Constitution in Modern America (Harvard University Press, 2010).  As a former Series’ author herself, she is committed to continuing the intensive and supportive collaborations between editor and author that is its hallmark.

Sally is particularly interested in work in legal history across American national history, including (but not limited to) religion, race, equality, property, suffrage, labor and poverty, as well as on particular areas of legal development, including the common law, legal reform, migration and westward expansion, and families and family structure.

Contact Information:
sbgordon@law.upenn.edu
sbgordon@sas.upenn.edu
215.898.3069

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schiller-photoReuel Schiller is The Honorable Roger J. Traynor Chair and Professor of Law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, where he teaches American legal history, administrative law, and labor and employment law.  He  has written extensively about the legal history of the American administrative state, and the historical development of labor law and employment discrimination law. He is the author of Forging Rivals: Race, Class, Law, and the Collapse of Postwar Liberalism(Cambridge University Press, 2015), as well as numerous articles on the history of American labor law and administrative law in the twentieth century. In 2008, he was awarded the American Bar Association, Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice Award for Scholarship in Administrative Law. Forging Rivals was awarded the 2016 John Phillip Reid Book Award from the American Society for Legal History  and received an honorable mention for the 2016 J. Willard Hurst Prize from the Law and Society Association. His current research focuses on the development of administrative law and the regulatory state after the collapse of the New Deal order.

Reuel is particularly (though not exclusively) interested in working with authors writing about subjects in nineteenth and twentieth-century American legal history related to state-building, the employment relationship, constitutional law, public law, and the interaction of race and class in the legal system. Though his own work sits at the juncture of legal, political, and intellectual history, he is delighted to work with authors across a wide range of methodologies and subjects.

Contact Information
schiller@uchastings.edu

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